[Mastwatch] Shorea albida

MinSheng Khoo khoominsheng at gmail.com
Fri Mar 28 22:36:46 PDT 2014


Dear All,

Most Parashorea, Dryobalanops & Fagaceae between Maliau Basin & Kalabakan
Forest Reserve (inc. Brantian-Tatulit VJR) are with flower buds.

Best,
MinSheng
 On Mar 29, 2014 12:15 PM, "Burslem, Dr David F. R. P. (School of
Biological Sciences)" <d.burslem at abdn.ac.uk> wrote:

>  Dryobalanops lanceolata is re-flowering in large numbers at Danum Valley
> (south central Sabah). There are also roadside trees flowering of Hopea
> nervosa (two trees) and Dipterocarpus gracilis (one tree) out of about 20
> species planted, but I didn't see any species (of dipts) flowering in the
> forest apart from the Dryobalanops.
>
>
>
> David
>
>
>
> *From:* mastwatch-bounces at lists.phylodiversity.net [mailto:
> mastwatch-bounces at lists.phylodiversity.net] *On Behalf Of *Ashton, Peter
> *Sent:* 27 March 2014 10:42
> *To:* Ferry Slik; Chuck Cannon; mastwatch at lists.phylodiversity.net
> *Subject:* Re: [Mastwatch] Shorea albida
>
>
>
> I wonder what proportion will be found to occur in *kerangas *streams as
> well. But you are right and, as Bob Morley related, peat swamp communities
> occur at least in SE Sunda early in the Miocene, quite long enough for tree
> speciation.
>
>
>
> Peter
>  ------------------------------
>
> *From:* mastwatch-bounces at lists.phylodiversity.net [
> mastwatch-bounces at lists.phylodiversity.net] on behalf of Ferry Slik [
> ferryslik at hotmail.com]
> *Sent:* Wednesday, March 26, 2014 7:48 PM
> *To:* Chuck Cannon; mastwatch at lists.phylodiversity.net
> *Subject:* Re: [Mastwatch] Shorea albida
>
> I saw a talk about peat swamp fish when I was at the Asian Biogeography
> meeting in Berlin last year, that also suggests that the peats have been
> around for a considerable time.... So they must have been moving around the
> Sunda Shelf, probably following the historical sea levels and with large
> expanses in central Sundaland during glacial maxima....
>
> Ferry Slik
> Associate Professor
> Faculty of Science
> Universiti Brunei Darussalam,
> Jln Tungku Link, Gadong, BE1410, Brunei Darussalam.
>
> Website
> http://www.phylodiversity.net/fslik/<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v1/url?u=http://www.phylodiversity.net/fslik/&k=AjZjj3dyY74kKL92lieHqQ%3D%3D%0A&r=uuSOiBYHtr8AmANgrRqMnUFHqcyISRHx4aalH86Onxg%3D%0A&m=J%2BzqtjNk7aNjVIL07%2FHruz%2FJhAccIfa0JEdKjo1Ymfs%3D%0A&s=2400e60a10d9eb0b938ca7a3d5c60bc1a6ae1a1236c3f2c6f11429f74f9215a3>
>
> Plants of Southeast Asia
> http://www.asianplant.net<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v1/url?u=http://www.asianplant.net/&k=AjZjj3dyY74kKL92lieHqQ%3D%3D%0A&r=uuSOiBYHtr8AmANgrRqMnUFHqcyISRHx4aalH86Onxg%3D%0A&m=J%2BzqtjNk7aNjVIL07%2FHruz%2FJhAccIfa0JEdKjo1Ymfs%3D%0A&s=686800c5ebb5637b88137844618bdeb3ec3cf48e241e1ab08271e0a76e12b27a>
>
> Asian plant species synonym website
> http://www.phylodiversity.net/fslik/synonym_lookup.htm<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v1/url?u=http://www.phylodiversity.net/fslik/synonym_lookup.htm&k=AjZjj3dyY74kKL92lieHqQ%3D%3D%0A&r=uuSOiBYHtr8AmANgrRqMnUFHqcyISRHx4aalH86Onxg%3D%0A&m=J%2BzqtjNk7aNjVIL07%2FHruz%2FJhAccIfa0JEdKjo1Ymfs%3D%0A&s=3d66c3458fb2103b15cbd81dcb24cf21e797fc1bdb2013fbec240a4408b1e81e>
>
>   ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 26 Mar 2014 09:23:36 -0500
> From: chuck.cannon at gmail.com
> To: mastwatch at lists.phylodiversity.net
> Subject: Re: [Mastwatch] Shorea albida
>
> Hi Peter,
>
> In thinking about these peats, it's imporatnt to include their historical
> geography.  For much of the last ice age, there was probably a large
> unified (?) peat in central Sundaland, possibly much larger and certainly
> slightly cooler than today.
>
> I've always been amazed that such a small forest type, that is often
> highly fragmented naturally, could produce such high biodiversity that was
> also highly specialized.  In extreme environments, you typically get a few
> species that strongly dominate the community because of clear and pervasive
> selection pressures.  perhaps the conditions are not as extreme as all of
> that either but there does seem to be a strong environmental filter.
>
> The fact that the area was probably substantially larger in the past would
> partially answer that question.
>
> All the best,
> Chuck
>
>
> On 03/25/2014 04:58 AM, Ashton, Peter wrote:
>
>  Hi ewverybody,
>
> All interesting, including Colin (Maycock?) at Danum who says there has
> been little drought up there to date, - out of kilter with Sunda further
> west as so often. But there is another potentially intriguing aspect of
> this issue which UBD sleuths can get on to, and for which I have brought
> Ian Baillie in as he has had an interest in the coastal climate of NW
> Borneo: Primary seringawan forest should evapotranspire roughly as much
> vapour as the sea surface, so where is the climatic coastline, on the true
> sea front or at the back of swamps where extensive? Of course coastal
> development, and conversion to oil palm down the coast, wil laffect this.
> But, if the climatic coastline is at the back of the swamp, that might
> explain why swamps flower at different times from inland forests.
>
> And Joe (it is always good to hear from you!), what has happened to what
> was left of Andulau, by far the most important forest for conservation from
> a tree species endemism perspective (and probably a lot more, such as soil
> fauna and flora, and arthropods, besides)?
>
> Peter
>
>
>
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